Scientific Library of Tomsk State University

   Digital catalogue        

The feeder system of the Toba supervolcano from the slab to the shallow reservoir I. Koulakov, E. Kasatkina, N. M. Shapiro [et.al.]

Contributor(s): Koulakov, Ivan | Shapiro, Nikolai M | Jaupart, Claude | Vasilevsky, Alexander | El Khrepy, Sami | Al-Arifi, Nassir | Smirnov, Sergey | Kasatkina, EkaterinaMaterial type: ArticleArticleSubject(s): сейсмическая томография | Тоба, вулкан | кальдерыGenre/Form: статьи в журналах Online resources: Click here to access online In: Nature communications Vol. 7. P. 12228 (1-12)Abstract: The Toba Caldera has been the site of several large explosive eruptions in the recent geological past, including the world’s largest Pleistocene eruption 74,000 years ago. The major cause of this particular behaviour may be the subduction of the fluid-rich Investigator Fracture Zone directly beneath the continental crust of Sumatra and possible tear of the slab. Here we show a new seismic tomography model, which clearly reveals a complex multilevel plumbing system beneath Toba. Large amounts of volatiles originate in the subducting slab at a depth of ∼150 km, migrate upward and cause active melting in the mantle wedge. The volatile-rich basic magmas accumulate at the base of the crust in a ∼50,000 km3 reservoir. The overheated volatiles continue ascending through the crust and cause melting of the upper crust rocks. This leads to the formation of a shallow crustal reservoir that is directly responsible for the supereruptions.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
No physical items for this record

Библиогр.: 38 назв.

The Toba Caldera has been the site of several large explosive eruptions in the recent geological past, including the world’s largest Pleistocene eruption 74,000 years ago. The major cause of this particular behaviour may be the subduction of the fluid-rich Investigator Fracture Zone directly beneath the continental crust of Sumatra and possible tear of the slab. Here we show a new seismic tomography model, which clearly reveals a complex multilevel plumbing system beneath Toba. Large amounts of volatiles originate in the subducting slab at a depth of ∼150 km, migrate upward and cause active melting in the mantle wedge. The volatile-rich basic magmas accumulate at the base of the crust in a ∼50,000 km3 reservoir. The overheated volatiles continue ascending through the crust and cause melting of the upper crust rocks. This leads to the formation of a shallow crustal reservoir that is directly responsible for the supereruptions.

There are no comments on this title.

to post a comment.
Share